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Product: Developing Java Beans

This book introduces Java's component architecture. It describes how to write Beans, software components that can be used in visual programming environments. This book discusses event adapters, serialization, introspection, property editors, and more.

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Ordering Information:
Retail Price: US$ 29.95
Manufacturer: O'Reilly
Category: Books_Prg
Shipping Weight: 2 lbs
Dimensions: TBD
ISBN-Code: 1-56592-289-1

Our Price: US$ 27.00
Part#: 00453
Item Code: None
Version: 1st Ed.
Classification: F
Date Posted: 1997/07/22
Last Update: 1997/07/22
UPC-Code: None
We strive to offer the best prices and availability to our customers. However, because the computer industry changes so rapidly, our prices and/or product availability may sometimes fluctuate. If your order will be placed at a later time, please check back to confirm price and availability.

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WorkGroup Solutions, Inc, PO Box 460190, Aurora, CO 80046-0190
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Copyright 1997 by WorkGroup Solutions, Inc. - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Product: Developing Java Beans, Further Information

Written by Robert Englander
1st Edition June 1997
316 pages

Further Information:

Java Beans is the most important new development in Java this year. Beans is the next generation of Java technology that not only adds features the language lacked, but also lets Java programs interoperate with a number of development environments. The initial release includes a bridge for Microsoft's ActiveX/COM; future releases will include bridges for Netscape's LiveConnect and IBM's OpenDoc.

Since it's a "component architecture" for Java, Beans can be used in graphical programming environments, like Borland's JBuilder, or IBM's VisualAge for Java. This means that someone can use a graphical tool to connect a lot of beans together and make an application, without actually writing any Java code -- in fact, without doing any programming at all. Graphical development environments let you configure components by specifying aspects of their visual appearance (like the color or label of a button) in addition to the interactions between components (what happens when you click on a button or select a menu item).

One important aspect of Java Beans is that components don't have to be visible. This sounds like a minor distinction, but it's very important: the invisible parts of an application are the parts that do the work. So, for example, in addition to manipulating graphical widgets, like checkboxes and menus, Beans allows you to develop and manipulate components that do database access, perform computations, and so on. You can build entire applications by connecting pre-built components, without writing any code.

Developing Java Beans is for people who need to stay up-to-date with the latest developments in programming technology. Minimally, developing Beans means adopting several simple design patterns in your code. However, that's only the beginning. To take full advantage of the Java Beans architecture, you should understand how to write classes that are serializable, use events for communication between classes, know when and how to provide BeanInfo classes that give graphical environments more information about your components, and provide property editors and customizers that let graphical tools work with more complex Beans.

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